Roger Moore’s Sense of Humor Smiles On

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roger Moore was one of the most charming men I’ve ever interviewed – no wonder he made such a convincing 007! He will be dearly missed. Below is an interview I did with him in 2014 for The Saturday Evening Post:

Roger Moore is as elegant and suave as ever. Time hasn’t dimmed his piercing deep blue eyes or his sly wit. The actor, known for his seven James Bond flicks, as well as the TV series The Saint and a raft of other roles, was knighted in 2003 by Queen Elizabeth for his work with UNICEF. These days, he kicks back at homes in Monaco and Switzerland with his fourth wife, Kristina Tholstrup — they’ve been together for 21 years — but you can’t exactly say he’s retired. Having recently published his third book, One Lucky Bastard — Tales from Tinseltown, now he’s taking his show on the road with An Evening with Sir Roger Moore. “I talk about the early days and the interesting stuff that happened to me. I even sometimes sing. Well, not actually. I make a noise that I call singing.”

Moore is the first to admit that his years as James Bond have never left him. But he’d like to set the record straight on one thing. “I never said ‘a martini should be shaken not stirred.’ I was nervous enough about having to say, ‘Bond, the name is James Bond,’ because I was afraid it would sound like I was doing an impression of Sean.”

Jeanne Wolf: You’ve had such an eventful life. Do you feel like a lucky bastard?

Roger Moore: Oh, absolutely. I can remember being told when I started out in the business that you needed 33 percent talent, 33 percent personality and looks, and 33 percent luck. I say it’s 99.9 percent luck. I’ve had a number of friends who were very talented, but luck didn’t come their way.

JW: You’ve been married four times. Are you wiser about women at this point in your life?

RM: The secret is that the man always will have the last word, which is “yes-dear.” When it comes to the ladies I’ve shared sets with, I credit Lana Turner for teaching me about kissing. In Diane when the king dies, I say to Lana, “You made me a prince, now make me a king,” and I’m supposed to throw myself on her and kiss her throat. In the first take she fell backward choking and said, “Cut, cut! Roger you are a wonderful kisser but when a lady gets to 35 she has to be careful about the neck. So do it again with the same amount of passion but less pressure.” As for love scenes, usually it’s 8 o’clock on a Monday morning, the studio has been shut over the weekend, the heat hasn’t been on, you’re freezing cold, it’s the middle of winter, and you have to sort of leap into bed with a lady who drops her towel or is wrapped modestly under the sheets and then the romance should start. There is no romance. I remember at the beginning of the first Bond film that I ever did I was in bed with an actress who was very well developed. And I had to have my arm over her rather voluptuous breasts to show that I was wearing a Pulsar watch because they’d paid a lot to get the publicity.

JW: You’ve changed a lot over the years and so has the Bond franchise. What do you think of the new guy, Daniel Craig?

RM: The 007 films have become far more action-oriented, a little more spectacular, and I think that Daniel is the right man for the time. Actually, I think he would have been the right man for any time because he really looks like James Bond should look — like a killer as Sean Connery did. Some people labeled me the most gentlemanly Bond. I think I said, “I could never kill anybody so I’d either bore them to death or hug them to death.” I was a part of some action scenes but I was always thinking “Am I quick enough on my feet to get out of the way of that?” That’s when the ego steps in and you say, “Oh, yes. I can do that. I’m a hero.” But inside I was quivering like mad.

There’s Nothing Funny About Old People Having Sex!

Tracy Letts and Debra Winger melt the screen in “The Lovers.” They play a married couple who rekindles their passion in the midst of affairs with other people. Tracy told me that even though it’s often portrayed on sitcoms as a laughing matter, there’s nothing wrong with a couple of older folks getting it on!

Pierce Brosnan is Back in the Saddle!

On the back of a speeding horse, Pierce triumphantly returns to television on AMC’s “The Son.” Click on the image above to read my entire interview with him for Saturday Evening Post.

JUNGLETOWN Gives Us a Taste of Paradise

There’s such an avalanche of shows to watch that it’s overwhelming to make a choice. I’m going to help you cut through the clutter. You’ve got to see JUNGLETOWN the new docuseries on VICELAND​ which airs Tuesday nights at 10 pm.

The NY Times called it “mesmerizing.” The Hollywood Reporter said, “It’s a reality show for people too cool to watch a reality show.” And Sling TV went even farther, concluding “It might be the most fascinating thing to watch on television.”

Why all the hyperbole? I’ve seen JUNGLETOWN and I was hooked from the very first episode. Award-winning documentary filmmaker, Ondi Timoner, has brought to the screen a compelling story of the real-life struggle to create a new world called Kalu Yala in the rainforest of Panama. Founder, Jimmy Stice, recruited the young and idealistic “interns” – mostly young college grads from the U.S. – who are trying to tap into their own dreams of a new life that will give them new hope for the future. A lot of them left privileged lives behind without giving a thought to the risk.

Sounds a little cliché doesn’t it? Not when Timoner puts you in the middle of a battle as these kids try to build a commune, fight the jungle, fight among themselves and, ultimately, grapple with whether it’s worth it to stay. It’s a wild ride. You’ll burst out laughing, you’ll cry and scream, sometimes you’ll want to look away, but you’ll keep coming back for more. And you’ll root for them to make it. I don’t know why. Maybe because in these tough times, these Trumpian times, we are all longing for a little slice of utopia ourselves.

Richard Gere Didn’t Mind Getting Schleppy

If you can’t picture Richard Gere as a little old Jewish guy then check out “Norman.” He plays a con man who never gives up even when he’s down and out. Richard told me he tapped his “inner schlub” to play the role.